I remember the day the penny dropped. As a school kid in 1975 I arrived home from school for my summer holidays to see new houses being built on rich farmland across the fields from my bedroom window. I had learned at school how Britain hardly managed to feed itself during the u-boat blockade of the 2nd world war, and asked myself: how can we afford to cover over fields with new houses while meeting our need for food?

Our 5-storey mixed use development in Exmouth Market for a private trust is now complete. Originally for rental, the trust decided to sell them on long leases. All flats were sold within days of being put on the market. Tim Crocker's photographs will follow soon.

Camden Passivhaus, London's first Passive House, bere:architects

The Technology Strategy Board funded FINAL REPORT of the Camden Passivhaus has now been published. The report is the result of two years 'Phase 2' in-depth monitoring of the performance of the Camden Passivhaus.

It's at this time of the year especially that I get a real buzz from the solar array on top of my house, and from the green roof planting that thrives in the cool shade beneath. From Spring to Autumn it's a real pleasure to go home and see how much heat has been harvested from the free energy of the sun. Normally from Spring to Autumn the domestic hot water for both the main house and the rented flat is virtually free. Indeed at present too much energy is produced and the plan one day is to use the 11metre long pool in the garden as a solar dump for all the excess solar energy.

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